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By: FZ AZ

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Monday, 11-Sep-2006 19:41 Email | Share | Bookmark
Esfahan Nights

Ali Qapu palace
Sheikh Lotf Allah Mosque
Abbasi(Emam) mosque
Not taken by me
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Siose pol (33 Bridge)
Siose pol (33 Bridge)
Siose pol (33 Bridge)
Siose pol (33 Bridge)
 
 
 
Siose pol (33 Bridge)
Siose pol (33 Bridge)
Siose pol (33 Bridge)
Siose pol (33 Bridge)
Siose pol (33 Bridge)
Walking in Naghsh e jahan square reminded me pure oriental Legends like 1001 Nights, yes i felt that i was in 400 years ago in a large square and i imagined Girlish dancings and Fireworks in Safavid Era !!!!That sqaure was also used as a polo- stick court, and
there were 110 canons opposite to the king's palace and there were scaterd 50000 lanterns all over the square,


More about safavid Era:

The Safavids (Persian: صفویان) were a native Iranian dynasty from Iranian Azarbaijan that ruled from 1501 to 1736, and which established Shi'a Islam as Iran's official religion and united its provinces under a single Iranian sovereignty, thereby reigniting the Persian identity and acting as a bridge to modern Iran.

The Safavid dynasty had its origins in a long established Sufi order, called the Safaviyeh, which had flourished in Iranian Azarbaijan since the early 14th century. Its founder was the Persian[1] mystic Sheikh Safi al-Din (1252–1334), after whom it was named.

Sheikh Safī al-Dīn Abdul Fath Is'haq Ardabilī came from Ardabil, a city in today's Iranian Azerbaijan where his shrine still exists. His mother tongue was Old Tati (Āzarī), an extinct Iranian dialect of the north closely related to Persian. He was a disciple of the famed Sufi Grand Master Sheikh Zahed Gilani (1216–1301) of Lahijan. Spiritual heir to Sheikh Zahed, Safi Al-Din transformed the inherited Zahediyeh Sufi Order into the Safaviyeh Order. Originally Safaviyeh was a spiritual response to the upheavals and unrest in northwest Iran/eastern Anatolia in the decades following the Mongol invasion. In the fifteenth century, the Safaviyeh gradually gained political and military clout in the power vacuum precipitated by the decline of the Timurid dynasty. After becoming the Safaviyeh leader in 1447, Sheikh Junayd - a descendant of Sheikh Safi Al-Din - transformed it into a revolutionary Shi'ite movement with the goal of seizing power in Iran.

Beginnings
During the 15th century, the Ottomans expanded across Anatolia and centralized control by persecuting Shi'ism. They outlawed it at the turn of the century. In 1501, various disaffected militia from Azerbaijan and eastern Anatolia collectively called the Kizilbash (Azeri for "red heads" due to their red headgear) united with the Ardabil Safaviyeh to capture Tabriz from the then ruling Sunni Turkmen alliance known as Ak Koyunlu (The White Sheep Emirate) under Alwand's leadership.

The Safiviyeh came to be led by a fifteen-year old, Ismail I. To establish political provenance, the Safavid rulers claimed to be descended from Imam Ali and his wife Fatima, daughter of the Prophet Muhammad, through the seventh Imam Musa al-Kazim. To further legitimize his power, Ismail I also added claims of royal Sassanian heritage after becoming Shah.

With the capture of Tabriz, the Safavid dynasty began. In May 1501, Ismail I declared Tabriz his capital and himself Shah of Azerbaijan. Ismail I continued to expand his base in northwestern Iran. He was declared Shah of Iran in 1502. Throughout the rest of the decade Ismail I fended off attacks from the Ottomans, stamped out the remnants of the Ak Koyunlu and continued to expand his territory — Hamadan in 1503, Shiraz and Kerman in 1504, Najaf and Karbala in 1507, Van in 1508, Baghdad in 1509, Khorasan and Herat in 1510. By 1511 the Uzbeks in the north-east were driven across the Oxus River where they captured Samarkand establishing the Shaibanid dynasty, and from which they would continue to attack the Safavids. During his reign, the official language at the royal court was Azeri.

In the meantime, the navy-less Safavids lost the island of Hormuz to the Portuguese in 1507.

In 1514, the Ottoman Sultan Selim I invaded western Armenia causing the ill-prepared Safavid army to retreat. The Safavids were poorly armed while the Ottomans had muskets and artillery. The Ottomans pushed further and on August 23, 1514 managed to engage the Safavids in the Battle of Chaldiran west of Tabriz. The Safavids were defeated and, as the Ottoman force moved on Tabriz, engaged in scorched-earth combat. Tabriz was taken but the Ottoman army refused to follow the Safavids into the Persian highlands and by winter retreated from Tabriz. This warfare pattern repeated itself under Shah Tahmasp I and Sultan Suleiman I.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safavid_dynasty




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