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Sunday, 21-May-2006 02:44 Email | Share | Bookmark
Persepolis - Part 5

Treasury
Treasury
In the Treasury, two almost identical reliefs were found
 
Treasury
 
 
 
 
In the Treasury, two almost identical reliefs were found
which once decorated the eastern and northern
of the Apadana. It is not known why they were removed
 
 
A big Water well
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tomb of Artaxerxes III
Tomb of Artaxerxes III
showing the king sacrificing to the eternal, sacred fire
showing bulls carrying the roof.
this room may also have served as last resting place of Artaxerx
Garison
Sewage System( 2500 years ago)
Sewage System( 2500 years ago)
 
 
 
 
A traditional restaurant near to Persepolis
 
Treasury
The Treasury of Persepolis , from the northeast. It belongs to the oldest building phase of Persepolis, the great design by king Darius I the Great. The other main element was the Apadana, where the great king received tribute from all the nations in the Achaemenid Empire, and gave presents in return.
This gift exchange was one of the central elements in the Persian royal ideology, and the Treasury was, therefore, one of the most important symbols of the great king's power. It is no coincidence that Alexander the Great, in 330, selected the Apadana and the Treasury to be destroyed, together with the Palace of Xerxes.
Many people were employed to keep the gold and silver shining: from the Fortification tablets, it is known that in 467 BCE, no less than 1348 people were employed in the Treasury (here seen from the southeast). It was rebuilt several times.
In the Treasury, two almost identical reliefs were found, which once decorated the eastern and northern stairs of the Apadana. It is not known why they were removed.
In the Treasury, several weights were found: large, heavy blocks of diorite with an inscription.
[b] Tomb of Artaxerxes III

There are six finished Achaemenid royal tombs. Four of them have been discovered at Naqš-i Rustam, two at Persepolis. The four at Naqš-i Rustam belong to Darius I, Xerxes, Artaxerxes I Makrocheir, and Darius II Nothuss. The Persepolis tombs, which are younger, must belong to the next two kings, Artaxerxes II Mnemon (404-358) and Artaxerxes III Ochus (358-338).'
The tomb on this webpage ) is usually attributed to Artaxerxes III, but may in fact be that of king Artaxerxes II Mnemon. If this sarcophagus indeed belonged to the third Artaxerxes, this room may also have served as last resting place of Artaxerxes IV Arses and Darius III Codomannus, because their never received a proper burial.
The upper part of the tomb, showing the king sacrificing to the eternal, sacred fire and the supreme god Ahuramazda. He stands on a platform that is carried by people that represent the subject nations.
One of the capitals of the pilasters of this tomb, showing bulls carrying the roof. The same design was applied in the palaces and audience halls of Persepolis. It is interesting to note that the motif of "carrying" is repeated on the upper level, where people carry the platform with the king.

http://www.livius.org/a/iran/persepolis/tombs/arta_iii.html



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