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Saturday, 20-May-2006 02:25 Email | Share | Bookmark
Persepolis - Part4

Palace of Darius
Palace of Darius
Palace of Darius
 
 
 
 
One of the building inscriptions, known as DPa. It says:
Darius, the great king, king of kings, king of countries,Hystas
 
The central room of the palace of Darius.
 
 
The central room of the palace of Darius.
This is one of the original entrances
 
The stairs were decorated with these figures: people bringing tr
 
 
 
 
The original main entrance, with a large double staircase
leading to the terrace, seen from the south.
 
Tomb of Artaxerxes III
Water chanals
 
Palace of Xerxes
 
Harem
 
 
 
Harem
The "horns" at the terrace wall near the palace of Artaxerxes I
 
 
 
 
the museum of Persepolis
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bronze spools
 
 
 
 
Iron: fastening used in stones
 
Burnt material
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pipe used for following water
 
 
 
 
 
A famous inscription (the "harem inscription" or XPf)
 
 
Palace of Darius
The palace of king Darius I the Great in Persepolis , according to the inscription known as DPa, built by Darius, but he did not live to see it finished. It was completed after his death in 486 by his son and successor Xerxes, who called the house a Taçara, "winter palace", in Antiquity. Its ruins are immediately south of the Apadana.

Compared to that building, the Apadana and the Treasury, the winter palace is well-preserved. A likely explanation is that it was spared when the Macedonian king Alexander the Great destroyed Persepolis in 330. His men were especially interested in the palace of the man who had once sacked Athens, and in the two two buildings that symbolized the Persian redistribution economy. Darius was, in European eyes, not a criminal.
In the third quarter of the fourth century, more than a century after the palace had been completed, Artaxerxes III Ochus added a western gate with a staircase, an added an inscription that is known as A3Pa.
Palace of Xerxes

The palace of Xerxes at Persepolis, called Hadiš in Persian, 'dwelling place', was twice as large as the Palace of Darius. A terrace connected the two royal houses. This picture shows Xerxes' palace (to the right), seen from the palace of Darius. The stairs are the best-preserved monument.
The central part of the stairs show Ahuramazda, flanked by two sphinxes, an inscription and several soldiers, which are sometimes called "apple bearers" or Immortals.
An inscription. The remainder of the palace is, compared to the palace of Darius, badly damaged. A likely explanation is that it received a special treatment when the Macedonian king Alexander the Great destroyed Persepolis in 330. His men were especially interested in the palace of the man who had once sacked Athens.

Harem
the southern part of the Harem of Persepolis, built between 480 and 470, during the reign of king Xerxes. The name "Harem" is modern, and it should be stressed that Achaemenid harems never existed and are in fact an invention by western scholars. Europeans knew about the harem of the Ottoman sultan, read about polygamous Persians, and projected their own ideas and obsessions on the ancient Near East. The rooms on this picture are almost certainly store rooms.
The store rooms again. They were built on the lower part of the terrace, out of sight from the palaces. (The same applies for the villa of the Roman emperor Hadrian at Tivoli: the store rooms and slaves' appartments are at a lower level.)
A famous inscription (the "harem inscription" or XPf) was found in what is called the Queen's apartment. It deals with Xerxes' succesion and mentions rival candidates:
My father Darius had other sons, but -thus was Ahuramazda's desire- my father Darius made me the largest [mathišta] after himself. When my father Darius went away from the throne, by the grace of Ahuramazda I became king on my father's throne.





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