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By: FZ AZ

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Sunday, 5-Mar-2006 13:44 Email | Share | Bookmark
Waterfalls &watermills of Shushtar

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Watermills
 
 
 
Generator set(1920s)
 
 
 
Watermills
 
 
 
 
 
Handmade waterfalls
Watermills
 
 
Watermills
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Watermills
Another day
 
 
 
The old name of Shushtar, dating back to Achaemenian times, was Šurkutir. The name itself, Shushtar, is connected with the name of another ancient city, Susa (or Shush, in Persian pronunciation), and means "greater (or better) than Shush."
During the Sassanian era, it was an island city on the Karun river and selected to become the winter capital. The river was channelled to form a moat around the city, while bridges and main gates into Shushtar were built to the east, west, and south. Several rivers nearby are conducive to the extension of agriculture; the cultivation of sugar cane, the main crop, dates back to 226 CE. A system of subterranean channels called qanats, which connected the river to the private reservoirs of houses and buildings, supplied water for domestic use and irrigation, as well as to store and supply water during times of war when the main gates were closed. Traces of these qanats can still be found in the crypts of some houses. This complex system of irrigation degenerated during the 19th century, which consequently led to Shushtar's decline as an important agricultural centre until revitalisation efforts began under the reign of the last Shah of Iran, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, in 1973.
When the Sassanian Shah Shapur I defeated the Roman emperor Valerian, he ordered the captive Roman soldiers to build a vast bridge and dam stretching over 550 metres, known as the Band-e Qaisar ("the emperor's bridge").
The ancient fortress walls were destroyed at the end of the Safavid era.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://www.livius.org/a/iran/shusthar/shushtar.html


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